Managing Money as a Person Who is Blind or Low Vision, Featuring Joe Strechay

A few months ago my oldest, typically-sighted son, Cash, called to say that he and his girlfriend were out hiking and found a beautiful log bridge over a stream. As they were crossing the log bridge, they decided to sit down and relax a bit. After getting comfortable they found themselves free-falling into the water below. The log broke! After air-drying in the sun he realized that his wallet was no longer in his pocket. (I later found out that he’d also lost his passport! But that’s a different story.)

Knowing that he was away from home without a wallet stressed me out and I immediately spun into full-blown-problem-solving-mom-mode. But in the midst of lecturing him and outlining all the steps that would be required to replace his items, I realized that this is his problem to solve and he can handle it. I relaxed, took a deep breath and offered suggestions while feeling a wee bit of satisfaction knowing he was about to embark on a total pain-in-the-butt journey and learn a lot of valuable lessons along the way.

So when my husband found our missing credit card laying on the floor in the van, I’m sure he felt a twinkle of justice knowing that I had been feeling the stress of my disorganized money management methods. Typically, I pay for my purchase then drop my payment method or change into my cavernous disorganized pocketbook. And, sometimes, when I hit the brakes just right the disorganized contents spill out of my unzipped purse onto the floor of the van.

When the hubs pays for something, no matter how long the line is behind him, he painstakingly places his change, payment method, and receipt into the proper spot in his wallet. It. Drives. Me. Nuts.

Now that my youngest, legally blind son, Kai, is spending money away from home without parental supervision, I catch myself wondering: Will he pay too much? Will he get proper change? Will unauthorized charges be placed on his bill? Will he drop his money? Continue reading “Managing Money as a Person Who is Blind or Low Vision, Featuring Joe Strechay”

From A Mother’s Perspective – Part 4 Featuring Holly Bonner

I’m thrilled to bring you the final episode in this 4 part series “From A Mother’s Perspective” that has been created in partnership with Victoria Claire of www.VictoriaClaire-BeyondVision.com. Today’s guest post is written by Holly Bonner from www.BlindMotherhood.com. Welcome Holly and thank you for sharing your story with us.

A Day in The Life of Blind Motherhood
Written by: Holly Bonner, Blind Motherhood

The static noise of the baby monitor blares behind my head. I can hear my three-year-old calling me, “Mommy, I’m awake.” I’ve slept the entire night in our Lazy Boy recliner… again. I look down at my chest and can barely make out my 18-month old daughter who’s been curled up on top of me since 3am. She is the image of perfection, even to this blind mother. I carefully run my fingers through her hair, caressing her curls. I touch her cheeks with my palm, in an attempt to gently rouse her from her sleep. My day of Blind Motherhood begins. Continue reading “From A Mother’s Perspective – Part 4 Featuring Holly Bonner”

From A Mother’s Perspective – Part 2 Featuring Kai Owens’ Mom, Kim

Part 2 in a special series with www.victoriaclaire-beyondvision.com
Written by: Kim Owens, mom of Kai Owens.

Letting Go

Overnight our bright, happy, outgoing 9-year-old-son, Kai, became anxious and afraid. He refused to sleep in the dark and he clung nervously to my side. His personality changed drastically and we were terrified. Over the next year, we visited many specialists but received no clarity.

Then one day I noticed that his handwriting started in the middle of the page and trailed off the right side.  I asked why he wasn’t using the left side of the paper and watched as he held the paper up to eye-level, and moved it from side to side, inspecting it closely.  Kai’s last eye exam had been 4 months prior, but I became certain that something was wrong with his vision.  The eye doctor agreed to take another look and that’s when he noticed that Kai’s retinas looked funny. Continue reading “From A Mother’s Perspective – Part 2 Featuring Kai Owens’ Mom, Kim”

From A Mother’s Perspective – Part 1 Featuring Victoria Claire’s Mom, Sandra Tinsley

Part 1 in a special series with www.victoriaclaire-beyondvision.com
Written by: Sandra Tinsley, mother of Victoria Claire

My daughter was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa when she was 19 years old and just beginning her adult life at university.  How dreadful that must have been for her.

I felt absolutely devastated for her and myself.  Having been such a good baby, totally happy, always laughing, nothing ever bothered her, she would tackle anything.

I cried, questioned myself asking was it something that I had done during my pregnancy, had I worked too hard?  We had moved house 2 week before she was born, she was also born with the cord around her neck.  You always think the worst trying to find answers. Continue reading “From A Mother’s Perspective – Part 1 Featuring Victoria Claire’s Mom, Sandra Tinsley”

Featured

When Drivers & Mobility Canes Intersect

Guest post by Kai Owens for Navigating Blindness

Hi, I’m Kai Owens. I am a 16-year-old athlete, drummer, and mainstream high school student. I’m also legally blind from Retinitis Pigmentosa. I’ve done a lot of Orientation & Mobility training locally, and I’ve also traveled extensively in the US and Vancouver, BC. I use my mobility cane at all times and I’ve recently been approved for a guide dog. I’d like to share a few of my observations about when drivers and mobility canes intersect.

At some point, most sighted people have been driving and seen a blind person and panicked.  Some of the encounters are full of mistakes that really do not make any sense. I’m going to walk you through a few common mistakes drivers make in hopes of raising awareness. Continue reading “When Drivers & Mobility Canes Intersect”

KnowledgeABLE Featuring Victoria Claire: Seeing Through My Creativity

Hi there Navigating Blindness followers, this is Victoria Claire from www.victoriaclaire-beyondvision.com  and I’m excited to share how creativity has helped me cope, grow and find joy with vision loss.

“Disability is not an impairment to creativity.”  This is one of my statements when engaging with the public while speaking as a sight loss awareness advocate.

As a professional artist in contemporary sculpture, with a career spanning 25 years, I would like to share with you the importance of my creativity whilst traveling along my pathway of sight loss. Creativity became my first port of call when I was at my lowest point after being diagnosed with RP at the age of 19 in 1994.  I was a young art student studying graphic design at art college when I found out I was going to go blind.  Initially, I didn’t know how to take in what I had been told.  For a while, I tried to ignore it and carry on with my life as an art student. Continue reading “KnowledgeABLE Featuring Victoria Claire: Seeing Through My Creativity”