Managing Money as a Person Who is Blind or Low Vision, Featuring Joe Strechay

A few months ago my oldest, typically-sighted son, Cash, called to say that he and his girlfriend were out hiking and found a beautiful log bridge over a stream. As they were crossing the log bridge, they decided to sit down and relax a bit. After getting comfortable they found themselves free-falling into the water below. The log broke! After air-drying in the sun he realized that his wallet was no longer in his pocket. (I later found out that he’d also lost his passport! But that’s a different story.)

Knowing that he was away from home without a wallet stressed me out and I immediately spun into full-blown-problem-solving-mom-mode. But in the midst of lecturing him and outlining all the steps that would be required to replace his items, I realized that this is his problem to solve and he can handle it. I relaxed, took a deep breath and offered suggestions while feeling a wee bit of satisfaction knowing he was about to embark on a total pain-in-the-butt journey and learn a lot of valuable lessons along the way.

So when my husband found our missing credit card laying on the floor in the van, I’m sure he felt a twinkle of justice knowing that I had been feeling the stress of my disorganized money management methods. Typically, I pay for my purchase then drop my payment method or change into my cavernous disorganized pocketbook. And, sometimes, when I hit the brakes just right the disorganized contents spill out of my unzipped purse onto the floor of the van.

When the hubs pays for something, no matter how long the line is behind him, he painstakingly places his change, payment method, and receipt into the proper spot in his wallet. It. Drives. Me. Nuts.

Now that my youngest, legally blind son, Kai, is spending money away from home without parental supervision, I catch myself wondering: Will he pay too much? Will he get proper change? Will unauthorized charges be placed on his bill? Will he drop his money? Continue reading “Managing Money as a Person Who is Blind or Low Vision, Featuring Joe Strechay”

From A Mother’s Perspective – Part 1 Featuring Victoria Claire’s Mom, Sandra Tinsley

Part 1 in a special series with www.victoriaclaire-beyondvision.com
Written by: Sandra Tinsley, mother of Victoria Claire

My daughter was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa when she was 19 years old and just beginning her adult life at university.  How dreadful that must have been for her.

I felt absolutely devastated for her and myself.  Having been such a good baby, totally happy, always laughing, nothing ever bothered her, she would tackle anything.

I cried, questioned myself asking was it something that I had done during my pregnancy, had I worked too hard?  We had moved house 2 week before she was born, she was also born with the cord around her neck.  You always think the worst trying to find answers. Continue reading “From A Mother’s Perspective – Part 1 Featuring Victoria Claire’s Mom, Sandra Tinsley”

Willingness is the Key

I am deeply tired. We have been having a rough time lately. My autoimmune disease has been flared up causing pain, fatigue and general malaise. Kai just underwent his bi-annual appointment at the eye clinic 4 hours from home. It’s hard to endure those long drives, long waits and painful tests when the outcome is only for school documentation — no treatment. Top that off with my oldest son having to learn some hard self-care lessons while away at college and sprinkle it with my dad’s inability to admit to a severe drug and alcohol addiction and I find myself wondering: Am I willing?   Continue reading “Willingness is the Key”

Special Education Mediation Experience

It’s been 5 days since our 8-hour mediation proceeding with the school district. (Yes, 8 long, emotionally draining hours.) The mediation was in response to a formal complaint we filed in September. Our allegations were that the school was not providing a Free Appropriate Public Education and was not upholding the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in the areas of Accessibility and IEP Implementation.

I’m writing this article to assist other parents of blind children who are facing these issues. I hope to convey the process as we experienced it, as well as the immense emotional toll it took on our family. Continue reading “Special Education Mediation Experience”

As Featured on Life After Sight Loss

It’s Fall and I’ll be super honest, I want to hibernate. I’ve been in a self-imposed cave trying to gather my emotional resources to go through the mediation process against our local school system.  (Click here to read more about the decision to file the complaint with the GADOE.) Conflict resolution is hard and some days it I feel overwhelmed and allow myself to have a full-blown pity party.  Other days I duck and cover and simply stay in and off of social media.  Other days I remember to take care of myself and eat well, meditate, paint and swim. Today, I stuck my head out of my cave long enough to re-connect with people in the sight loss community. And, I was so encouraged to listen to a podcast by my new friend Derek Daniels at Life After Sight Loss. Continue reading “As Featured on Life After Sight Loss”

Blindness and the Sixteenth Birthday

Last week was Kai’s 16th birthday.  I remember when we first heard the words “your son is going blind” and the feelings of dread and loss that swept over me when I realized he would not be able to drive.  It’s been 6 years since diagnosis, but right now we are feeling the diagnosis and loss acutely — like a fresh wound. Continue reading “Blindness and the Sixteenth Birthday”